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authorAndras Timar <atimar@suse.com>2012-09-17 13:25:34 +0200
committerAndras Timar <atimar@suse.com>2012-09-17 13:25:34 +0200
commitdfebf90e0f9aed3088bff8b6a0c84f2faed5179d (patch)
tree08619787fc1d2381dd626a9f9e338fdd7e146ce7 /helpcontent2/source
parent553a1ca576118595d7c1aa3ca1083431c8f663d0 (diff)
replace ." to "., related: fdo#54987
Change-Id: Ieae3928f40550f36a726e285ef150181e2b2e95d
Diffstat (limited to 'helpcontent2/source')
-rw-r--r--helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091100.xhp4
-rw-r--r--helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091200.xhp8
-rw-r--r--helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091400.xhp4
3 files changed, 8 insertions, 8 deletions
diff --git a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091100.xhp b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091100.xhp
index 0e06a533e..8989994ca 100644
--- a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091100.xhp
+++ b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091100.xhp
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3149054" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="4">Braces "{}" are used to group expressions together to form one new expression. For example, "sqrt {x * y}" is the square root of the entire product x*y, while "sqrt x * y" is the square root of x multiplied by y. Braces do not require an extra space.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3151392" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="CHG" oldref="5">Set brackets were previously inserted in the Elements window or directly in the Commands window as "left lbrace &lt;?&gt; right rbrace". Now, a left and a right set bracket can also be inserted using "lbrace" and "rbrace", with or without wildcards.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147403" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="6">There are a total of eight (8) different types of brackets available. The "ceil" and "floor" brackets are often used for rounding up or down the argument to the next integer: "lceil -3.7 rceil = -3" or "lfloor -3.7 rfloor = -4".</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3146320" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="63">Operator brackets, also known as Bra-kets (angle brackets with a vertical line in between), are common in Physics notation: "langle a mline b rangle" or "langle a mline b mline c over d mline e rangle." The height and positioning of the vertical lines always corresponds exactly to the enclosing brackets.</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3146320" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="63">Operator brackets, also known as Bra-kets (angle brackets with a vertical line in between), are common in Physics notation: "langle a mline b rangle" or "langle a mline b mline c over d mline e rangle". The height and positioning of the vertical lines always corresponds exactly to the enclosing brackets.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3157870" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="7">All brackets may only be used in pairs. The brackets have some common characteristics:</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3155761" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="CHG" oldref="8">All types of brackets have the same grouping function as described for "{}" brackets.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3145590" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="9">All types of brackets, including those that are visible, permit empty group definition. The enclosed expression may therefore be empty.</paragraph>
@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@
</list>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147514" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="33">In this way, intervals like the one above can be built in <emph>$[officename] Math</emph> without any problems: \[2", "3\) or "\]2", "3\[ (Attention: These quotation marks are part of the entry.)</paragraph>
<paragraph role="note" id="par_id3153532" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="34">Please note that the quotation marks must be entered and can be obtained with <emph>Shift+2</emph> and not with typographical quotation marks. Generally, punctuation marks (like the comma in this case) are set as text. Although it is also possible to type "\[2,~3\)" the above option is preferable. In the previous example, "fixed size" always describes a bracket size dependent on the font size used.</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3153674" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="35">Nesting groups within each other is relatively problem-free. In the formula hat "{a + b}" the "hat" is displayed simply over the center of "{a + b}". Also, "color red lceil a rceil" and "grave hat langle x * y rangle" work as expected. The result of the latter can be compared to "grave {hat langle x * y rangle}." These attributes do not compete, but rather can be combined.</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3153674" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="35">Nesting groups within each other is relatively problem-free. In the formula hat "{a + b}" the "hat" is displayed simply over the center of "{a + b}". Also, "color red lceil a rceil" and "grave hat langle x * y rangle" work as expected. The result of the latter can be compared to "grave {hat langle x * y rangle}". These attributes do not compete, but rather can be combined.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147526" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="36">This differs slightly for competing or mutually influencing attributes. This is often the case with font attributes. For example, which color does the b have in "color yellow color red (a + color green b)", or which size does it have in "size *4 (a + size /2 b)"? Given a base size of 12, does it have the size 48, 6 or even 24 (which could be seen as a combination)? The following are basic resolution rules, which will be followed consistently in the future. In general, the rules apply to all group operations. This only has a visible effect on the font attributes, like "bold", "ital", "phantom", "size", "color" and "font":</paragraph>
<list type="unordered">
<listitem>
diff --git a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091200.xhp b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091200.xhp
index b1fd04bdd..905d1e23b 100644
--- a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091200.xhp
+++ b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091200.xhp
@@ -57,12 +57,12 @@ dedr: fixed #i30770#</lastedited>
<paragraph role="code" id="par_id3156316" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="11">a_2^{3_4}</paragraph>
<paragraph role="code" id="par_id3145207" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="12">a_{2^3}^{4_5}</paragraph>
<paragraph role="tip" id="par_id3151173" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="13">Unlike other formula editors where "<emph>_</emph>" and " <emph>^</emph> " only refer to the next character ("a_24" refers only to the "2"), $[officename] Math refers to the entire number(s)/name(s)/text. If you want to put superscripts and subscripts in sequence, the expression can be written as follows: a_2{}^3 or a^3{}_2</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3154260" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="15">To write tensors, <emph>$[officename] Math</emph> provides several options. In addition to the notation "R_i{}^{jk}{}_l", common in other applications, additional notations can be used, namely "R_i{}^jk{}_l" and "{{R_i}^jk}_l."</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147516" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="16">Super- and subscripts to the left of the base character can also be right-justified. To do this, the new commands "lsub" and "lsup" are used. Both commands have the same effect as "sub" and "sup", except that they are left of the base character. See also "a lsub 2 lsup 3."</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3154260" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="15">To write tensors, <emph>$[officename] Math</emph> provides several options. In addition to the notation "R_i{}^{jk}{}_l", common in other applications, additional notations can be used, namely "R_i{}^jk{}_l" and "{{R_i}^jk}_l".</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147516" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="16">Super- and subscripts to the left of the base character can also be right-justified. To do this, the new commands "lsub" and "lsup" are used. Both commands have the same effect as "sub" and "sup", except that they are left of the base character. See also "a lsub 2 lsup 3".</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3154276" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="17">The rules governing unambiguity and the necessity of using brackets remain the same. In principle, this can be achieved with <emph>{}_2^3 a</emph>.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="note" id="par_id3152961" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="18">The commands "sub" and "sup" are also available as "rsub" and "rsup".</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3158437" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="20">Using the "csub" and "csup" commands, you can write super- and subscripts directly above or below a character. An example is "a csub y csup x". Combinations of indexes and exponents together are also possible: "abc_1^2 lsub 3 lsup 4 csub 55555 csup 66666."</paragraph>
-<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3154570" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="21">Super- and subscripts can be attached to most unary and binary operators. Two examples: "a div_2 b a&lt;csub n b +_2 h" and "a toward csub f b x toward csup f y."</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3158437" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="20">Using the "csub" and "csup" commands, you can write super- and subscripts directly above or below a character. An example is "a csub y csup x". Combinations of indexes and exponents together are also possible: "abc_1^2 lsub 3 lsup 4 csub 55555 csup 66666".</paragraph>
+<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3154570" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="U" oldref="21">Super- and subscripts can be attached to most unary and binary operators. Two examples: "a div_2 b a&lt;csub n b +_2 h" and "a toward csub f b x toward csup f y".</paragraph>
<paragraph role="warning" id="par_id3155904" xml-lang="en-US" l10n="CHG" oldref="19">Be sure to also enter all spaces between characters when entering these examples into the <emph>Commands</emph> window.</paragraph>
</body>
</helpdocument>
diff --git a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091400.xhp b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091400.xhp
index 7b63344c0..0e3095b2c 100644
--- a/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091400.xhp
+++ b/helpcontent2/source/text/smath/01/03091400.xhp
@@ -45,8 +45,8 @@
<bookmark xml-lang="en-US" branch="index" id="bm_id3153923"><bookmark_value>scaling; in %PRODUCTNAME Math</bookmark_value></bookmark><paragraph l10n="U" role="heading" level="1" id="hd_id3153923" oldref="1" xml-lang="en-US"> <link href="text/smath/01/03091400.xhp" name="Scaling">Scaling</link></paragraph>
<paragraph xml-lang="en-US" role="paragraph" id="par_id3147173" l10n="U" oldref="2">More detailed information about scaling in <emph><item type="productname">%PRODUCTNAME</item> Math</emph> as well as some examples can be found here. (The quotation marks in this text are for emphasis purposes only and are not part of the examples.)</paragraph>
<paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3156316" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="3">The factorial is not scaled (example: "fact stack{a#b}" and "fact {a over b}") but is oriented using the baseline or center of the arguments.</paragraph>
- <paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3150756" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="4">Brackets always have a fixed size as well. This applies to all symbols that can be used as brackets. Compare "(((a)))", "( stack{a#b#c})", "(a over b)."</paragraph>
- <paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147570" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="7">Brackets preceded by "left" or "right", however, are always adjusted to the argument. See "left(left(left(a right)right)right)", "left(stack{a#b#c}right)", "left(a over b right)."</paragraph>
+ <paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3150756" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="4">Brackets always have a fixed size as well. This applies to all symbols that can be used as brackets. Compare "(((a)))", "( stack{a#b#c})", "(a over b)".</paragraph>
+ <paragraph role="paragraph" id="par_id3147570" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="7">Brackets preceded by "left" or "right", however, are always adjusted to the argument. See "left(left(left(a right)right)right)", "left(stack{a#b#c}right)", "left(a over b right)".</paragraph>
<paragraph xml-lang="en-US" role="paragraph" id="par_id3145206" l10n="U" oldref="11">Some <link href="text/smath/01/03091300.xhp" name="Attributes">Attributes</link> have fixed sizes; do not change these if they are placed above a long symbol.</paragraph>
<paragraph role="warning" id="par_id3154694" l10n="U" xml-lang="en-US" oldref="12">The spaces in the examples are required for the correct structure. You may not delete them when making entries in the Commands window.</paragraph>
</body>